Upgrading to Windows 8.1

Sunday, 15 September 2013

With Microsoft making Windows 8.1 available through MSDN, I thought I'd try upgrading an existing Windows 8 instance. The process was very smooth:

  1. I downloaded the appropriate .iso
  2. Opened the .iso file in Windows 8
  3. Ran setup.exe
  4. Entered license key
  5. Chose to keep existing settings and applications
  6. Wait a while and reboot
  7. Wait a while and then log in
  8. All done

The only problem I've noticed is that connecting the Mail and Calendar apps to an Exchange server with a self-signed certificate no longer works. I'd previously figured out a way to work around this for Windows 8, but it no longer works for 8.1.

Code analysis error CA0055 with a project upgraded to .NET Framework 4.5

Monday, 29 July 2013

I have a Visual Studio solution that was upgraded to use .NET Framework 4.5. It was working fine until I started getting the following error(s) running Code Analysis as part of the build:

CA0052 : No targets were selected

CA0055 : Could not load D:\dev\MySolution\MyProject\bin\Release\MyProject.exe. The following error was encountered while reading module 'System.Xml': Could not resolve type reference: [mscorlib, Version=4.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b77a5c561934e089]System.Runtime.CompilerServices.IAsyncStateMachine

That seemed odd, as I confirmed that the application did have an assembly reference to System.Xml. I even tried re-adding the reference but that made no difference. The interesting thing is that the type (IAsyncStateMachine) is new in .NET 4.5, even though it is included in mscorlib Version 4.0.0.0. That’s because 4.5 is an in-place upgrade.

I did notice that you do get separate copies of the reference assemblies located in C:\Program Files (x86)\Reference Assemblies\Microsoft\Framework\.NETFramework. Reflecting on the mscorlib.dll assembly in the v4.0 folder showed it did NOT have IAsyncStateMachine, but the one in the v4.5 folder did. Could that be relevant?

Opening up the .csproj file, I discovered that another assembly reference suspiciously had the following HintPath defined

<Reference Include="System.Web">

  <HintPath>C:\Program Files (x86)\Reference Assemblies\Microsoft\Framework\.NETFramework\v4.0\System.Web.dll</HintPath>

</Reference>

Re-adding this reference, resulted in Visual Studio changing it to just this:

<Reference Include="System.Web" />

And then re-building the solution with Code Analysis enabled was successful.

Aussie Toilets–Featured WP8 store app on 2nd July

Monday, 1 July 2013

In it's 2 and a bit year history, this is the first time I've ever seen Aussie Toilets listed as a featured app in the Windows Phone 8 Store!

Screenshot of Windows Phone 8 Store

It's one of the featured apps for 2nd July 2013. Nice! Smile

Winter 2013

Monday, 17 June 2013

Autumn leavesIt's getting cold in Adelaide – the middle of June, and the leaves are turning yellow and red on some of the trees in our garden. The jonquils are blooming, and the daffodils won't be far behind.

Jonquil flowers


We've got a great crop of mandarins and lemonades. Been enjoying the mandies with lunches and juiced a couple of bucket loads of lemonades already.

MandarinsLemonade fruit

The tangello has a few more fruit this year, and the new lime tree also has a couple already (though it obviously isn't liking the cold as it's lost most of it's leaves. I hope they grow back in spring).

Tangello fruitLime fruit

It's been pretty wet the last few weeks, so there's some interesting mushrooms growing in the garden mulch

Mushrooms growing in mulch

Lean from the Trenches by Henrik Kniberg

Thursday, 23 May 2013

I was introduced to "Lean Thinking" by my friend Jane, who's been involved in applying the "Toyota Production System" principles in a major public hospital setting (not the first place you'd think of finding something that was created by a car manufacturer). After learning about Lean and considering that it seemed to have some overlap with the Agile software development processes that have become more popular in the last 10 years, I then discovered the work of Tom and Mary Poppendieck who had published Lean Software Development: An Agile Toolkit, the first of 3 books on the subject.

Reading their work is still on my 'to do' list, but it was while I was reviewing their recommended reading list that I decided to purchase Kniberg's book.

Lean from the Trenchesis an fascinating case study in applying Lean and Kanban to the development of a software application for the Swedish Police. Kniberg worked as a coach part-time on the project for about 7 months before publishing this book. As I understand it, this was a 'greenfield' application (which might explain how they could do the 30 bug limit).

I found this book very interesting. In particular, the following stood out for me:

I'm most familiar with Scrum, so there was a reasonable amount of familiarity with some of their practises. The focus on the Kanban board was interesting. I do like the fact that it is so visible. Kniberg feels having a physical board is important, though I wonder how that would work if he had to manage distributed teams.

In summary, a great read with some thought-provoking ideas.